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Search Results 0 to 18 of about 19 (some duplicates have been removed)
. chris cillizza, the foreign policy, in many regards, has been run out of the white house, and perhaps even more so because mcdonagh, the deputy of national security director is going to be the next chief of staff. >> right. no reason to think that will change. andrea, look, we don't focus enough on foreign policy, but the challenges, we focus on the domestic challenges for barack obama, and as we talked about, his inaugural speech was very domestically focused. look, we just had elections in israel, john kerry not in the same place benjamin netanyahu is regarding a two-state solution, at least right now. there are huge challenges, iran, there are huge challenges in the foreign policy front that don't get talked about as much, but are clearly things that not only will be difficult for the president and his team to navigate, but will also have a significant say in how this president is viewed by history. >> and, by the way, we just got word that the white house is going to proceed with a nomination of general allen to be the nato supreme allied commander now that he's been cleared by th
opens more than 200,000 jobs to women. >> ifill: then, we turn to u.s. foreign policy, as confirmation hearings begin for secretary of state nominee john kerry, two former national security advisers stephen hadley and zbigniew brzezinski weigh in. >> brown: paul solman looks at china's fast growing economy and asks, is it headed for a crash? >> wages are rising for the burgeoning middle class, but for hardscrabble factory workers: mounting protests against unlivable wages and working conditions. >> ifill: and vice president joe biden hangs out with hari sreenivasan on google plus to talk about gun violence. >> make your voices heard. this town listens when people rise up and speak. >> ifill: that's all ahead on tonight's "newshour." >> major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: >> and by the alfred p. sloan foundation. supporting science, technology, and improved economic performance and financial literacy in the 21st century. >> and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... >> this program was made possible by the corporation for public broad
this at all, richard, to discredit the president on foreign policy? >> i have to say that i think that benghazi is largely a function of people who suffer from obama-derangement syndrome, because i think that people who are kind of looking at the facts, does this trace to the white house, and does it trace to the president or the secretary of the state, and i h think that every bit of information that we have so far the answer to all of the questions so far is no. might they keep hammering it? of course, but at the end of the day, i don't believe we will look back in the second term and said, man, they should have gotten that benghazi behind them, because they have. >> and do you think that we will be talking about benghazi coming up? >> we, the facts and the more that the white house and the administration says this happened and by the way, that happened and not just from the partisan perspective, but coming from the state department and so forth, and with all respect, it is the senate role to ask the tough questions and the question is whether or not it is a legitimate con ver
at the kerry nomination and foreign policy challenges he'll face, with two men who've served as national security adviser to the president. zbigniew brzezinski held that position with president carter. he's now a counselor at the center for strategic and international studies. stephen hadley served under president george w. bush. he's currently a senior adviser at the united states institute of peace. welcome to both of you. first, zbigniew brzezinski, your thoughts on john kerry as nominee for secretary of state? >> i think he's an absolutely top-notch choice. very good. experienced, solid, energetic with a broad vision and with a strong focus on trying to stabilize those parts of the world that are especially dangerous. i think he's practical, intelligent, well informed. >> brown: stephen hadley? >> he's in a way spent his whole life preparing for this job and it's good he did because he takes in the a very challenging time and i think he's going to have a lot of challenges before him. i think one of them is to prioritize where he's going to put his time. >> brown: well, you know, he s
of fundamental issues for a president, guns and keeping the government going and fighting for his foreign policy team. it's not like he's looked for a fight. let's face it, newtown forced everybody to deal with this. >> newtown has changed everything. >> i don't think he's looking for a fight. i think he's found one. >> i agree with you. i think since the election this has been the best period the president has had in the last four years. a lot of things have come together for him. he's in sync with the country, and the country is in sync for him. the question for the gop, are you prepared for this barack obama? you didn't seem to be able to handle the first one. are you prepared for this one who now has the kind of wind in his sails going into a second term that can be very, very good for him in terms of at least in the first six or so months laying down some hard lines for the gop to cross. i think they can, but they're going to have to make the argument, you know, from a principled position, get off the crazy noise we have -- >> don't they have -- >> distract -- >> on an issue we just talked
choice to carry forward the obama administration's foreign policy, and i urge his speedy confirmation. >> and at her side one of her toughest critics on benghazi. today recounting how he and fellow vietnam veteran john kerry worked together to normalize relations with vietnam in the 1990s. >> helping to establish a relationship with vietnam that serves american interests and values rather than one that remained meyered many mutual resentment and bitterness is one of my proudest accomplishments as a senator. i expect it is one of john's as well. witnessing almost daily his exetch lear statesmanship is one of the highest privileges i've had here. >> kerry's first appearance on the senate foreign relations panel as an activist. some things don't change. >> how do you ask a man to be the last man to die in vietnam? >> i'm tired of -- >> when i first came to washington and testified, i was testifying as part of the group of people who came here to have their voices heard, and that is, above all, what this place is about, so i respect, i think, the woman who was voicing her concerns about t
will say about foreign policy. we are at a point this and i am worried personally about the next four years but i am curious how much, both that he ended the war in iraq and the war is receding or does he say american is signals something other than thorough retreat from the world which is how it looks. >>bret: we have the address tomorrow, but the state of the union in a couple of weeks away, what is the biggest challenge? >> we are in a real threat to our security at home and overseas but we are in a fiscal crisis. we are at odds, we have a president and a republican party not speaking to each other, we are headed, again, to the edge of the default. we have to come up with a solution to that. americans are weary of the aspirational calls for unity they hear from president at state of the union addresses and inaugural addresses but everyone is paying holiday bills worried their taxes could go up. they know that congress is broken. they know the congress is paralyzed. they know president obama was complicity in that. the republicans made a plan do go after him, but he is complicity that the
. the important foreign-policy issue of benghazi. it was something we were talking about a month ago, but it faded into the background. everybody will be watching tomorrow. it is a big deal to have the secretary of state come in. everyone wants to hear what she has to say about this. she becomes less of a focus because she's leaving, some say. but it will be really important hearing. the group publicans' want a special committee formed to investigate the because the issue, but they did not get that. all we will crb hearings where we get a picture of it from people who were heading the operation. so her parents will be very big tomorrow. guest: more broadly, on national security, we will enter the beginning of confirmation hearings for john kerry as secretary of state, chuck hagel as secretary of defense. consideration of our military strategy, our military spending, how we project american power as we complete a winding down of the war in afghanistan. it is really going to be the end of a post-9/11 period in national security policy, with the policy going for it from there still unsettled. guest:
for a secretary of state and for the united states generally in foreign policy have not waned. they have probably increased. in libya and benghazi and secretary clinton tried to make this point and senator kerry as well that the funding for all of these things is -- it's a fine it amount of money, and it's shrinking at the moment. the difficulty of a world that remains kredably complex, probably more complex, with our somewhat increasingly limited ability to sort of address every hotspot that we like, it's a very, very difficult challenge for any secretary of state. john kerry or anyone else. we saw it with hillary clinton. yes, she had successes clearly, but she also centeringled at times too. i don't know if it's a job no one wants. john kerry clearly wants it. it's not an easy job, by any measure. >> in fact, john kerry has want that job all his life. susan page, he even got emotional today talking about his father, who is a foreign service officer and how he was raised az foreign service kid traveling around the world. something that was held against him when he was running for president in 2
. then he becomes a lame duck and then you have to start shifting more and more toward foreign policy, traveling around the world. on the domestic agend ahe has a very short time before he becomes a lame duck. >> the president's inaugural address tomorrow is a tradition that dates back to george washington in 1789. the president plans to look ahead more than back in the speech. let's get some insight from the wall street journal columnist. what are your thoughts on what the president needs to say in order to be most effective, to best set himself up, going into the next four years? >> reporter: well, i don't know. we will find out what he and his aides have decided about that, just about 24 hours from now. i think a second inaugural address is always a little bit difficult, you know? a first inaugural, everybody's new and excited and it's like superman coming out of the telephone booth and showing you the big "s" on his chest. a second inaugural is like, hi, it's me again. so you want to -- you want to try to make it fresh and new anyway. and i think this president has a real opportun
of the second administration. second term. >> foreign policy is your expertise. three weeks ago we would not have thought of africa being a threat to americans. what concerns you about that situation? what can the president do about going forward? >> i think if we're talking about mali and places around mali, the president should support those who are going to lead the french. the french have a unique relationship and interest in mali. i think we should support them to the extent we can. they're one of our nato allies and they have been a friend of ours. but we have to keep our eye on the places. i don't think it will require american soldiers on the ground, but we have to realize that al qaeda has been badly diminished. let's not overlook the success we have had. but it doesn't mean it's gone away. and it doesn't mean that every al qaeda cell is getting ready to attack the united states of america. they're doing other things in the region as well. so be vigilant. help our friends. i don't think there's a need for a commitment of american troops. >> mr. secretary, thank you so much for b
Search Results 0 to 18 of about 19 (some duplicates have been removed)